Assessment and Diagnosis

 

 

Assessment of Preschool Children

There are not many instruments to assess feelings and atti­ tudes of preschool chjldren who stutter, but two are worth noting. The first is the KiddyCAT (Hernandez, 2001; Vanryckeghem, Brutten, & Hernandez, 2005;Vanryckeghem, Hernandez, & Brutten, 2001), which was designed to assess communication attitudes of  preschod children  who stutter. It consists of 12 yes/no questions asked by the clinician after some practice items. An example is “Do you think that Mom and Dad like the way you talk?” The questions are asked in a play environment, such as putting a marble in an egg car­ ton after each response. Higher scores indicate more nega­ tive attitudes about speech. In a sample of 45 children who stutter (ages 0- 3 to 5- 6) and 63 children who don’t (ages 2- 3

to 3-6), the mean scores were 4.35 (SD = 2.78) for children

who stutter and 1.79 (SD= 1.78)for children who don’t. This difference is statistically significant (p <.001).

Another assessment tool for attitudes and feelings of preschool children who stutter takes an indirect approach by surveying parents abou t the impact of stuttering on the child and themselves (Langevin, Packman, & Onslow, 2010). The survey- TI1eImpact of Stuttering on Preschoolers and Parents (ISPP)- consists of 20 questions covering (a) child-related questions (e.g., “Hasyour child ever been frustrated when stut­ tering?”); (b) questions about playmates (e.g., “Has your child ever been teased by other children about his stuttering?”);and

parent-related questions (e.g., “Has your childs stutter­ ing ever affected you emotionally?”). One of the purposes of this tool, according to the authors, is to help decide whether to enroll the child in treatment or to delay treatment to see if stutter ing resolves. This survey awaits further testing to assess valid ity and reliability 

 

Preschool Child

Preassessment Clinical Questions Initial Contact Case History Form

AudioNideo Record ing Assessment

Parent-Child Interaction Parent Interview

Clinician-Child Interaction Talking about Stuttering A Child Who Won’t Talk

A Child Who Is Entirely Fluent

Speech Sample

Pattern of Disf/uencies

Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSl-4) Test of Childhood Stuttering

Speech Rate

Feelings and Attitudes

Other Speech and Language Behaviors Other Factors

Physical Development Cognitive Development

Social-Emotional Development Speech and Language Environment

Diagnosis

Determining Developmental and Treatment Level

Typical Disf/uency Borderline Stuttering Beginning Stuttering

Risk Factors for Persistent Stuttering Drawing the Information Together

Closing Interview: Recommendations and Follow-Up Recommendations for Children with Typical Disfluency Recommendations for Children with Borderline or

Beginning Stuttering

School-Age Child

Preassessment Clinical Questions

Public School Considerations Initial Contact with Parents Case History Form AudioNideo Record ing

Assessment Parent Interview

Teacher Interview Classroom Observation Child/Student Interview Speech Samples

Preliminaries

Pattern of Disf/uencies

Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSl-4) Speech Rate

Trial Therapy

Feelings and Attitudes

Other Speech and Language Disorders Other Factors

Physical Development Cognitive Development

Social-Emotional Development Academic Adjustment

Diagnosis Closing Interview

Public School Setting

Adolescents and Adults

Preassessment

Clinic versus School Assessment Case History Form

Attitude Questionnaires AudioNideo Recording

Assessment Interview

 

 

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